Second letter to the Nobel Peace Prize Committee

from Overseas Chinese Concerned with Chinese Democracy

To: Nobel Peace Prize Committee

Date:October 4, 2010

Respected Nobel Prize Committee:

We wrote to you in March this year to express our opinion that Mr. Liu Xiaobo is unsuitable as a candidate for the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize. Our reason is that as early as twenty years ago he collaborated with the totalitarian Chinese Communist Party (CCP) by making a speech on national TV denying CCP’s crime of murdering innocent students in Tiananmen Square.

In January 12th, 2009, nearly one year after he was illegally detained, he made a statement entitled “I have no enemies——my final statement” during his trial in a Beijing court. In this statement, he glorified the CCP’s prison system, and praised the CCP for putting “respecting and protecting human rights” into the constitution, and describing it as “a sign that human rights have become one of the fundamental principles of Chinese law.” His open praise in the last twenty years for the CCP, which has never stopped trampling human rights, has been extremely misleading and influential. Through these deeds he has lost the moral image fit for a Nobel Peace Prize recipient.

Additionally, we would like to inform you of a new development. That is, a letter entitled “Appeal for the Nobel Peace Prize for Liu Xiaobo” that someone recently sent to you has become a scandal, because the authors of the letter put all the names of a list in their possession on the letter as cosigners without their consent. In just a few days a number of people have issued statements on the Internet that their names had been used without their knowledge, and some of them did not even agree that Liu Xiaobo deserved the Prize. As far as we know, the following people have their names put on the letter without their consent: Yang Zi, Bei Ling, Deng Huanwu, Wang Zang, Liu Guokai, Xiong Yan,Zeng Dajun.

Most unfortunately, Ms. Yang Zi, whose name was also unwittingly included, is the wife of the well-known dissident writer Wang Ruowang. Wang wrote a long article over ten years ago criticizing Liu Xiaobo’s collaboration with the CCP. However, nine years after his death, his wife’s name was used to support Liu Xiaobo. In her phone call to the web writer San Mei, Yang Zi expressed her disappointment for the un-consented use of other people’s names, and said that many more than the above-mentioned names were also used without consent. Mr. Bei Ling, whose name was also unwittingly included, is the Chinese translator of Vaclav Havel’s book. In his article “It is freedom, not laureate”, published on September 30, 2010, he said that “I was really unexpected to see myself as a cosigner of a letter with the title ‘Appeal for the Nobel Peace Prize for Liu Xiaobo’, because I had never received from any person or organization a request for my signature on the letter, and I have never signed my name on the letter.”

Attorney Jiang Tianyong from Beijing also issued a statement on October 1, 2010 to withdraw his signature from the appeal letter. In his statement he explained his reason for the withdrawal: “I was deeply disappointed by those who always manage to defame Gao Zhisheng, Hu Jia and Chen Guangcheng when appealing for giving Liu Xiaobo the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize. When even the life or death of Gao Zhisheng is still unknown, when the whole family of Chen Guangcheng is being persecuted even as of today, and when Hu Jia is being imprisoned despite incurable diseases, how can I blow the same horn as those who persistently try to put them down?”

Such acts of using other people’s name without their consent and degrading other imprisoned lawyers is not only cheating the Nobel Prize Committee and the Western world, but also damaging the name of the Chinese dissidents, which makes the image of Liu Xiaobo even worse. We hope the Nobel Prize Committee will become aware of this situation.

Finally, Mr. Liu Xiaobo has been sued in the US Federal Court in a civil rights case, which is filed on August 30, 2010 (see web link at http://dockets.justia.com/docket/new-york/nysdce/1:2010cv06444/367294/)
This law suit has once again made Liu Xiaobo extremely controversial among Chinese dissidents. His nomination has also been questioned by more people.
Based on the afore-mentioned three reasons, we urge the Nobel Committee to seriously consider our opinion, namely, as a highly controversial figure, Mr. Liu Xiaobo has lost the moral image fit for a Nobel Peace Prize recipient.

Sincerely and respectfully yours,

Co-signers:

Bian Hexiang

Anti-CCP activist. Member, Central Committee of Chinese Social Democratic Party; Chairman, The Coalition of Guards For American Values, Inc.; blacklisted by CCP for the pursuit of freedom and democracy in China and support for Fanlun Gong’s struggle against persecution. Now living in New York City, USA.

Huan Xuewen

Freelance writer. Passport invalidated by CCP in 1992 for joining overseas independent students and scholars organizations and opposing the 1989 massacre by CCP. Now living in Essen, Germany.

Liu Guohua

Anti-CCP activist, Former Associate Professor of Northeastern University, China. Vice Chairman, The Coalition of Guards For American Values, Inc. Now living in New York City, USA.

Liu Xiaodong

Freelance writer, Pen name: San Mei. Blacklisted by CCP for supporting and participating in Chinese pro-democracy movements. Now living in Chicago, USA.

Lu Decheng

Anti-CCP activist. Sentenced to imprisonment for 15 years for participating in the 1989 Tiananmen pro-democracy movement and defacing Mao’s portrait on Tiananmen with paint-filled eggs; released on parole in 1998. Now living in Calgary, Canada.

Wang Shenglin

Chinese dissident, Senior Financial Information Analyst at HSBC. Blacklisted by CCP for supporting and participating in Chinese pro-democracy movements. Now living in Chicago, USA.

Wu Fan

Anti-CCP activist. Chief Editor, China Affairs, member of Independent Chinese PEN Centre; member, Coordinating Committee of Chinese Liberal Culture Movement; labeled as a rightist by CCP in 1957, charged as a reactionary and sentenced to imprisonment for 20 years in 1968; served in labor camp for 12 years; released in November, 1979, and then taught in Anhui Teachers College, China. Now living in Los Angeles, USA.

Xiao Hong

Freelance writer. Now living in Denmark.

Xiao Jing

Manager, Broad Book USA. Rose against CCP for mother’s persecution by CCP for practicing Falun Gong; Canadian citizen. Now living in New York City, USA.

Xu Shuiliang

Anti-CCP activist. Devoted to Chinese pro-democracy movement from 1973; jailed twice from 1975-1979 and May 1981- May 1991 for supporting and participating in Chinese pro-democracy movements. Now living in New York City, USA.

Xu Yi

Associate Professor at University College London, UK. Blacklisted by CCP for supporting and participating in Chinese pro-democracy movements, and denied passport renewal for many years. Now living in London, UK.

Yuan Hongbing

Freelance writer, jurist, founder of Chinese Liberal Culture Movement. Arrested by CCP for participating in the 1989 Tiananmen pro-democracy movement; exiled to Guizhou, China; sought political asylum in Australia in 2004. Now living in Sydney, Australia.

Zhang Guoting

Anti-CCP activist, Internet writer. Arrested and sentenced to labor camp in 1960 at age 16, subsequently sentenced to life imprisonment for reactionary crimes, served in prison for 22 years, released in 1982 and fled to Denmark. Now living in Denmark.

Zhong Weiguang

Freelance writer. Blacklisted by CCP for publications that point out the problems of Communism and Communist culture, and articles that criticize the CCP government; passport invalidated by CCP in 1997. Now living in Essen, Germany.

Contact persons:
Diane Xiaodong Liu
Email: DianeLiu28@sbcglobal.net
Tel: 312-733-8123

Yi Xu, Ph.D.
Reader in Speech Science
Department of Speech, Hearing and Phonetic Sciences
University College London
Chandler House
2 Wakefield Street
London WC1N 1PF
UK
Cell: +44 07910 455 428.
Tel: 020 7679 4082 (internal 24082)
Fax: 020 7679 4238
email: yi@phon.ucl.ac.uk

http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/yi/

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